Zombie Foreclosure–What is it?

Zombie foreclosures happen when the homeowner assumes they have lost their home and moves when the bank begins foreclosure, but the foreclosure process is never completed. So both the homeowner and their title are caught in between this world and the next, like a zombie.

The problem is that once the homeowner leaves, there’s an opportunity for real estate taxes to go unpaid and the property to go unmaintained, which often leads to code enforcement violations, vandals, and even squatters. You wind up with a whole slew of new problems—which the homeowner, not the bank, can still be liable for without even knowing it

Your first step when fighting back against a zombie foreclosure is to check the county or tax records. These are online in most areas now and will show you if you’re still on the title.

Anyone who has been foreclosed on might want to do this, if only to be sure. If you see that the bank has started but not finished a foreclosure, contact the bank and try to find out what their plans are.

The good news is that most banks are far more open nowadays to negotiate a short sale, deed in lieu of foreclosure, or agree to a loan modification than they were when most of these foreclosure cases were started.

The next step is to review current records for past due taxes, code violations, or other liens, and check out the property condition. You want to make sure you do what you can to avoid any more damage than what has already occurred and to also secure the home.

Depending on the circumstances, you may be able to rent the home or move back into it—a happier ending than most zombie movies get to see.

 

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Undervalued Appraisals Creating Problems

The real estate market is recovering but still faces hurdles from tight
mortgage credit, but problems with a sizeable share of real estate appraisals
also are holding back home sales.

Most appraisers are competent and provide good valuations that are compliant
with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice. However,
appraisals generally lag market conditions and some changes to the appraisal
process have been causing problems in recent years, including the use of
out-of-area valuators without local expertise.

I recently have had two transactions fall apart because of undervalued appraisals.

For more real estate news and information in the Destin-Niceville-30A area, go to www.DestinHomeRealty.com or contact me at 850-305-6256.

 

Real Estate Prices on the Rise

For local information about the Destin, Santa Rosa Beach, Niceville, and Crestview areas, contact me at MykeSaysSold@aol.com  850-305-6256

Reasons To Buy a NEW Home–Santa Rosa Beach Area

Top 5 Reasons to buy a new home

I have been helping customers negotiate some great deals on new homes here in the Florida Panhandle.

I wanted to share the top 5 reasons to buy a new home compared to a re sale.

You have to look at the total savings or as I like to call it the total cost of
ownership.

New Homes usually come with special incentives that are not always advertised “Free Stuff
New Homes will have a lower cost to insure when compared to a re sale
New Homes must meet a very high level of energy efficiency
New homes can be bought with very attractive financing offers
New Homes have a lower cost of annual maintenance

When you stack up all the savings purchasing a New Home is something you want to take a closer look at.

Although a new home may have an initial higher purchase price the overall monthly cost of ownership can be much lower than a home only ten years old.

New home builders are always contacting realtors about specials that are about to become available before they are made available to the general public.

DR Horton has 13 new communities here in the Florida Panhandle–great homes at a great price!  Contact me today to take advantage of these deals.

Real Estate Investors Have Positive Effect!

The Washington Post

By Justin Pierce

Despite some shifts in the housing market that make it more difficult to earn money investing in residential real estate, a large majority of people in that field plan to buy as many or more properties in the next 12 months to rent out or sell for profit. That’s one of the findings of a study released last month that attempted to measure the impact people involved in income or speculative real estate are having on the housing market . The survey — sponsored by BiggerPockets.com, the nation’s leading social Web site for real estate investors, and Memphis Invest, one of the largest providers of single-family rentals — shows that 65 percent of investors plan to buy a lot more homes during the next 12 months. Still, from my experience in the Washington area, business conditions are changing with rising home prices, stiffening competition and shrinking margins. Anyone seeking to get into real estate investing should proceed with caution and not expect to earn the same money that has been made in the past few years. The report points out that investors played a fairly substantial role in the housing recovery. The housing crisis pushed nearly 4 million foreclosures onto the open market, devastating home values. This and the coinciding financial crisis squashed homebuyers’ confidence and their ability to buy. At that time, real estate investors began buying up the foreclosures when few other people could enter the market. They bought up so many properties that they established single-family rentals as a $100 billion business. In fact, the report says that single-family rentals now outnumber apartment units. They are also renovating the homes they buy and spending an average of $7,500 per home. That totals more than $9.2 billion every year in construction-related spending, according to the report. This is critical business for an industry that was hit hard by the recession

Market Trends in Niceville Florida

Listing price – Niceville

Average Listing Price  $316,792  -1.1%
Median Sales Price  $241,000  +12.1%
Average Price/sqft  $124  +10.7%
Number of Sales  109  -32.7%

Market Report on Miramar Beach Florida

Miramar Beach Summary

The median sales price for homes in Miramar Beach FL for Jul 12 to Sep 12 was $250,000. This represents a decline of 0.8%, or $2,000, compared to the prior quarter and an increase of 8.7% compared to the prior year. Sales prices have depreciated 38.2% over the last 5 years in Miramar Beach. The average listing price for Miramar Beach homes for sale on Trulia was $588,757 for the week ending Oct 03, which represents a decline of 1.7%, or $10,065, compared to the prior week and a decline of 2.9%, or $17,327, compared to the week ending Sep 12. Average price per square foot for Miramar Beach FL was $168, a decrease of 6.1% compared to the same period last year.

 Miramar Beach average property price

For Sale By Owner–I can do it myself and save lots of money!

The house has to be immaculate inside and out,

Potential buyers are beating on your door and calling the number you posted out in the yard

The legal and financial details of the home sale process loom.

Don’t be tempted to handle this situation by yourself; instead, make your life infinitely easier and use a Realtor to help you sell
your home.

The lure of saving money is a strong one.

Most Realtors charge between 6 to 7% on commission. As the seller, this comes out of your proceeds
at closing. I know you’re thinking that there’s no way that using a Realtor is worth anywhere near this much money.

However, it truly is worth every penny; here are the top reasons why you should use a Realtor when selling your home.

1. The Security of Your Family and Home

You cannot put a value on the security of your family and home. You
want your family to be safe in your home without having to worry. But remember
when I mentioned the hoards of potential buyers for your home? If you sell your
home yourself, you have to meet with each one of these buyers by yourself. The
problem is you never know who these people really are. It’s horrific to
consider, but it has happened where people have gone to a home on the premise of
looking to purchase it and instead have committed a crime.

The realtor, with the use of an electronic lockbox, knows exactly who was in the house AND when!  Realtors also get to know their clients, so there are not strangers casing your home.

When you use a Realtor, you don’t have to meet with the potential buyers and expose yourself and your family to possible harm. Instead, each person that enters your home is accompanied by a licensed Realtor.
Because the person is in your home with a Realtor, you and your family don’t need to be there. This mitigates the risk of someone harming you while in your home.

The chance of someone committing a crime against your property, either through theft or vandalism, is drastically reduced by their Realtor being
present.

2. The Value of Your Time

Let’s consider the hassle of dealing with potential buyers. When you sell your home yourself, you’re the sole contact with potential buyers.
If someone wants information, they contact you. This means your phone can be ringing constantly.  You can’t just ignore these calls; if you do, your house will take even longer to sell.

Remember the part about keeping your house immaculate? When you sell your home yourself, this has to be true 100% of the time.

People can and will pull up outside your home and demand to look inside at any time of the day or night. If you ask them to come back at
a more convenient time, you could easily lose a sale.

By using a Realtor, your time is reaffirmed to be as valuable as I know that it is.  A Realtor handles all the phone calls, and is
specially trained in how to answer these calls professionally without compromising the sale of your home. Your Realtor coordinates the showings
with other Realtors, leaving you with specific times for the showings. This will allow you to relax and enjoy the time you have remaining in your home.

3.  The Value of Peace of Mind for the Future

Selling a home is a complicated legal and financial prospect. Sure, you can buy generic forms to fill out for the Purchase Agreement and everything else.   But what assurance do you have that they’re filled out in a way that protects you for the future? After all, you certainly don’t want to deal with a lawsuit five years from now with your buyer saying that you made an error in the paperwork on the transaction.

When you hire a Realtor, they shoulder this burden. Realtors are required to carry what’s known as Errors & Omissions insurance. This
insurance protects you from such little errors. If there’s a problem, the insurance company is who works to resolve the situation, not you.

So don’t succumb to the lure of saving the commission money.

Hiring a Realtor is the absolute best thing you can do as you prepare to sell your home

Why Hire A Real Estate Agent?

The typical real estate transaction involves at least two dozen separate individuals – insurance assessors, mortgage brokers and underwriters, inspectors, appraisers, escrow officers, buyer’s agents, seller’s agents, bankers, title researchers, and a number of other individuals whose actions and decisions have to be orchestrated in order to perform in harmony and get a home sale closed. It is the responsibility of your real estate agent to expertly coordinate all the professionals involved in your home purchase and to act as the advocate for you and your interests throughout.

Seven main roles of your real estate agent
A Buyer’s Real Estate Agent:

  1. Educates you about your market.
  2. Analyzes your wants and needs.
  3. Guides you to homes that fit your criteria.
  4. Coordinates the work of other needed professionals.
  5. Negotiates on your behalf.
  6. Checks and double-checks paperwork and deadlines.
  7. Solves any problems that may arise.

Top 10 Mistakes Home Buyers Make

Mistake #1: Waiting for the market to improve or not buying at all

No one can predict precisely where the market is going, so trying to time your home purchase with the bottom of the market is futile. If you’re financially and emotionally ready to be a homeowner, it’s always a good time to buy. Just think: all the time you spend procrastinating on purchasing a home, you could be building equity, getting tax deductions and enjoying the many other benefits of homeownership

Mistake #2: Making an offer without contingencies

When you’re buying a home, Plan A is always to buy the home on the terms in the original contract. Plan B is to buy the home after renegotiating some of the terms. Plan C is the contingency plan: if there is an irresolvable flaw in the condition of the home, the home doesn’t appraise for the purchase price, or your lender refuses to fund your loan for whatever reason, you can back out of the transaction with no penalty (other than the money you’ve spent on inspections) so long as you have the appropriate contingencies in place. Remember, contingency = the right to bail.

Mistake #3: Not reading the fine print

If you did your homework, you had your trustworthy real estate attorney review all your paperwork and discuss it with you so you don’t get a nasty surprise at closing.

Mistake #4: Forgoing a home inspection

Even if a home looks flawless, it’s a mistake to assume that it’s actually problem-free. All homes have defects — even brand new ones — so getting a professional inspection before making the commitment to buy is crucial. Be sure to attend the inspection so the inspector can explain any issues

Mistake #5: Falling for love at first sight

Buying the first house you like is kind of like marrying the first person you go on a date with: not necessarily a good idea. If you don’t shop around and see what else is out there, you could miss out on a good deal or potentially regret your purchase.

Mistake #6: Buying a house you can’t afford

Just because a lender is willing to loan you a fortune doesn’t mean you should take it. Buying more home than you can afford can quickly lead to financial trouble. As a rule of thumb, your mortgage payment should be less than 28 percent of your gross monthly income. Besides your mortgage payment, be prepared for the additional costs of homeownership, such as insurance, property taxes, utilities and maintenance

Mistake #7: Buying a foreclosure or fixer-upper without doing your research

Some homebuyers are so set on finding a bargain, they overlook the fact that buying a home that needs repairs can be a stressful and expensive endeavor. Before buying a fixer-upper, get estimates on any necessary repairs and renovations and make sure they will pay for themselves in increased property value

Mistake #8: Not researching the neighborhood

What good is having your dream home, if you don’t like the community where it’s located? Before shopping for a home, shop for a neighborhood. Make sure it’s a good fit for your lifestyle — figure out how long you want your work commute to be, how close you want to be to amenities like shopping and nightlife, and which school districts are the best. Even if you don’t have children, living near good schools raises your property value.

Mistake #9: Thinking short-term

The house you purchase should be a place that feels like home to you and your family, but it’s important to remember that it’s also a huge investment. When shopping for a home, it pays to think about resale down the road. Search for homes in sought-after locations, and look for features that future buyers will want, such as central air conditioning and lots of storage space.

Mistake #10: Not getting pre-approved before house hunting

Why get your hopes up looking at $500,000 homes, when you can really only afford a $300,000 home? Before you start house hunting, narrow down your price range by getting pre-approved. Shop for a lender or mortgage broker you can trust. The mortgage pro will review your credit, income, assets and debts, and recommend a mortgage with monthly payments that fit your budget. The result is a good faith estimate, a document that spells out the likely terms of your loan, including the interest rate and closing costs. Not only does this let you know how much house you can afford, it also lets sellers know that you’re serious about buying.